I am a remnant of the old revolution

thawra

I am a remnant of the old revolution, the 25th of January, 2011 revolution. I still remember the chants, the smell of tear gas, the fear I felt when I saw the Central Security Forces (CSF) running after us. I still remember.

 On the 30th of June, 2013, thousands of Egyptians went to the streets angrily demanding that President Mohamed Mursi step down. Dr. Mursi did several mistakes, and he is not really a good politician. He gave long speeches that were incomprehensible (at least to me) but he was not evil, he was trying to be as honest and transparent as possible.

 I didn’t go out on the 30th of June because there was no plan and no leader. When we did this with President Hosni Mubarak we took a leap of faith, but then the army took over and made our lives hell for a year and half. Military trials for civilians, curfews, assassinations of activists, massacres of Ultras Ahly in a Port Said soccer stadium, the killers of the January 25th revolution were acquitted, female protesters were forced to undergo virginity tests, among many other atrocities.

Now we are doing the same thing. The army came out and gave the opposition 48 hours to come up with a solution and surprise surprise…they couldn’t. So Mursi’s power was given to the high constitutional court, Judge Adly Mansour.

 I don’t know him, but if Liberals thought that the elections were fraudulent, well guess what? Adly Mansour was supervising those elections. He was also a long-serving judge under former President Hosni Mubarak. And NOW he holds all POWERS, so let’s hope he is a trustworthy person because then we are screwed.

 The 30th of June protests included activists, the felool (remnants of the old regime) and the police. Yes, the police was involved, an entity that is supposed to be neutral and protect everyone. The police were holding pictures of the martyrs whom they killed in the 2011 revolution, demanding justice.  The thought alone leaves me speechless.


Egypt internet

What now?

 Sami Anan, former Chief of Staff of the Egyptian Armed Forces, announced that they regained their revolution, and expressed his happiness with the success of 30th of June revolution.

This is essentially a revolution of the revolution

General Sisi, the Minister of Defense, didn’t give a timeline for when this transition period would end and he dissolved the constitution. Which means we must continue to pressure the army to plan for the elections as early as possible.

 We are not done. This new revolution is not over.

This is essentially a coup because we didn’t elect the person in power now and the power is not in civilian hands.  

Even though everyone is refusing to admit it. Or maybe it’s as Robert Fisk suggested: “When is a military coup not a military coup? When it happens in Egypt, apparently.”

We ousted Mursi just like we did with Mubarak, and again gave the power to the army.

If Mursi had everyone under his control, how come the police went out against him? How come all those people marched against him? Because the police, army, and other governmental agents were not under his control. He was completely alone. I do believe he tried his best. 

Mursi did not shut down all channels that were speaking against him like what the army did this week with all the religious channels. 

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The military, state security and police are arresting the Muslim Brotherhood leader (déjà vu anyone?), they are arresting them without any charge yet. The sad thing is that they now will imprison them with the consent of the people.

 The Islamists and the Muslim Brotherhood made grave mistakes. They blindly followed their leaders, they refused to have a dialogue, and they assumed that refusing an Islamic state essentially meant that corruption would spread.

Those leaders gave their followers the feeling that their Muslim identity was under attack. I wish they would open their eyes and accept diversity, which includes everyone. I really wished they hadn’t excluded us like that.

During Mursi’s presidency the media was brutal, both the Islamist and the Liberal media. For a year it was as if the media was giving us shots of hate against each other and AGAIN we fell for it, just like during Mubarak ‘s time, and during the military rule in 2011. 

This new revolution brought hope to many but it also changed our lives.

As many celebrated, clashes happened causing the death of more than 20 people and injuring more than 200. More that 100 women were sexually assaulted and raped on Tahrir Square.

I can’t celebrate until this unknown transitional period ends. I hope Egyptians start tolerating each other and refuse to kill each under any circumstances. I wish we would learn to respect each other despite our differences. I wish we understand that the people in power don’t really care about us; they will do anything to protect themselves.

 To continue these devastating times the morning of july 8th 2013, the army raided the MB sit at the republic guard palace killing 53 people including 8 women, 5 children and 2 infants. My heart breaks for them.

People are still defending the army despite what happened and saying the MBs were armed. May I remind you of the Maspero protests where the army killed and ran over Christians with tank then they said the Christians were armed. They had a press conference concerning the MB massacre and they didn’t mention the 53 people who died. As if they were nothing.

 On July 9th , SCAF issues a constitutional declaration which is extremely dictatorial and clearly made to oppress people.

Is it too hard to get a leader who cares?

I wish for a true leader that wants what is best for this country. 

I want a leader who will fight for the fathers and mothers who have to go through hell everyday to put food on the table, who will fight for the women and men who decided to take a low paying job instead of working in prostitution and drugs, who will fight for all the children who had to run away from their abusive parents and forced to live on the streets because they have no where else to go, who will fight for the rights of minorities.

We are all brothers and sisters in this country and I shall fight for our rights, freedom, social justice, and bread…until my last breath.

afraid